The World Cup and the End of Soccer Headers

“Use your head!!” yell some parents from the sidelines. Our coach winces at my son’s high kick to bring down the soccer ball – he shouts at my 11 year old son and motions to his head, an instruction for my son to use his head the next time. My son glances at me from across the field. 

What the other parents and my son’s coach don’t know is that my son is not allowed to do headers in soccer. That’s our deal. If he wants to continue playing the game, he’s not to use his head; otherwise, I won’t let him play anymore. You might say if I wasn’t going to let him play the game fully, why did I ever get him into the sport in the first place? Well, prior to letting him start, I was pretty ignorant about the sport and its physical nature. Another one of those things I wish I knew before. . .

Unfortunately, with World Cup 2022 mania sweeping the globe and my household, I can see that headers are still very much a part of the game.  Will disallowing headers ever be possible? Would it “ruin” the sport?  Soccer is a highly physical contact sport and headers are certainly not the only source of major injury, but header rules are perhaps the most straightforward thing to change about the sport to reduce the risks of head injury and long term brain damage. 

Mom, what a buzzkill, right? Seriously, first, no screen time, and now, we can’t even play soccer like we’re supposed to? And, like with the France vs. Argentina final coming up, nobody wants to hear about that now! Surprisingly, I did find some recent research and media commentary suggesting that a ban on headers may be in the future.

Soccer Football – FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 – Quarter Final – England v France – Al Bayt Stadium, Al Khor, Qatar – December 10, 2022 England’s Harry Maguire in action with France’s Olivier Giroud REUTERS/Hamad I Mohammed

What’s the Danger of Headers in Soccer?

First, there is increasing evidence to support my anxiety. Cognitive impairment can result from just a single training session involving the practice of headers. Whether that impairment is just short term or long term is yet unknown (but we could take an educated guess on what the research will likely find). Plus, do any of us knowingly want that impairment even if it’s just for a day? Don’t practice headers before your math test? 

Long term, it’s suspected that soccer players may eventually suffer from CTE (chronic traumatic encephalopathy – a degenerative brain disease) as has been the case with MLS players, Scott Vermillon (confirmed CTE), Bruce Murray (suspected CTE, early dementia in his 50’s), former England international, Jeff Astle (confirmed CTE), and many players in American football. CTE is caused not only by repeated concussions, but it’s also suspected that small, repetitive hits to the head have the same damaging effects.

Will Headers Ever Be Banned from Soccer?

Soccer organizations in England and Scotland have already responded to the growing research on the dangers of headers by putting guidelines on heading practice in adult games. In both the US and England, soccer authorities have delayed the introduction of headers in youth soccer. 

With the World Cup in Qatar going on, I’ve caught a few articles covering soccer that discussed the end of headers, including a New York Times piece projecting that with increasing evidence, it’s just a matter of “when,” and not “if” headers will eventually be banned.

The more studies that come out to show the risks of headers and the more educated parents become on the dangers of letting their kids beat their heads with a high velocity ball, the harder it will be to knowingly endanger the long term health and safety of all the athletes and our kids.  

Resources

A sampling of the media attention to the dangers of headers and the possibility of ending them:

Soccer players with dementia or CTE:

In the US, moms’ organized to delay (or eliminate) the use of headers in youth soccer:

Ruining the sport if we ban headers – the comments at the end of this article highlight the perspective of those who feel the sport should be left alone:

Storelli tries to sell some head gear by pointing out that headers are not the only cause of concussions (although they are the cause of CTE and dementia):

Favorite Audiobooks for Kids

There have been a few standout audiobooks that my kids have really enjoyed so far over their elementary and early middle school years.  For the most part, the books themselves are well known and already wonderful, but the particular readers have made these audiobook stories even better! The way these narrators know how to perform the dialogue, pausing, enunciating, emphasizing, applying different tones and voices, can really transform the story experience. 

You can find these audiobooks free at the library and at many of the audiobook apps such as Hoopla, Overdrive, and the like. I hope you enjoy these as much as we did!

Here is the list of what we have loved so far:

Roald Dahl Books

In the Roald Dahl audiobook collections, look for these versions:

The Whipping Boy

 by Sid Fleischman, read by Spike McClure – funny adventurous tale of two boys, one a prince and the other a poor commoner, and the relationship that grows between them

Henry Huggins 

by Beverly Clearly, read by actor and Broadway star Neil Patrick Harris – tales of trivial everyday childhood experiences that Clearly writes with such hilarious insight and Harris reads with such perfection.

A Cricket in Times Square

by actor Tony Shalhoub, famous, I believe, from the TV show, Monk, and The Marvelous Miss Maisel – a heartwarming story of a special little cricket and his animal friends.

A Series of Unfortunate Events (Books 1-13)

by Lemony Snicket and narrated by Lemony Snicket (the author himself) or Britsh actor, Tim Curry – this series about unfortunate orphans trying to escape a terrible villain had us both laughing and sitting at the edge of our seats in suspense. The readers really made the characters come alive.

The Westing Game 

by Ellen Raskin, performed by Jeff Woodman – this classic mystery is really one of the all-time best mysteries for children in the way it unravels from character to character.

96 Miles

by J.L. Esplin, narrated by Robbie Daymond – Two brothers must travel 96 miles through the hot Nevada roads without barely any food or water. This book may be more interesting for ages 9 and up. The narrator really makes this story worth listening. He reads the entire book with such emotion, possibly surpassing the imagination that would have come with silent reading.

Have you heard some superbly narrated audiobooks for kids? I would love to hear about them! Please share below or email me at wishiknewbefore20@gmail.com

Prevent Foot, Knee, and Heel Pain from Soccer Cleats 

The standard fit of soccer cleats doesn’t make any orthopedic sense (see this article on podiatrists whose patients play soccer) and yet, it’s the norm. If you play soccer in cleats, you probably know they can be pretty uncomfortable. However, when I was a new soccer mom, the first time I went shopping for cleats for my kids, I was stunned by the stiffness and narrow shape of the shoe. The uppers were stiff, synthetic leather and the sole plate was hard plastic with a thin, flat insole. I sucked it up and after twisting many a pair, I settled on some Nike cleats that I generally find are the least stiff of all the brands. Fast forward through 5 years of soccer playing, and my kids started complaining of knee and heel pain, enough to knock them out of sports for weeks at a time. 

I wish I had paid more attention to the cleat fit issue from the beginning because now I realize what I should have done from the start to help the cleats fit better. It should be standard soccer education along with “what is a shin guard?” Here is a list of the things I learned to do to help the cleat fit as much as possible:

Replace Insoles with OTC Orthotic Inserts

Far and away, the best thing you can do to make your cleats fit more comfortably is to replace the soccer cleat insoles with orthotics. Out of the box insoles on cleats are minimal drop with minimal padding. If you follow some principles behind minimalist footwear, it would seem like this is a good thing. However, the stiffness of the shoe and rigidity of the soleplate probably negates this. 

Instead, the insole should provide some of the shock absorption and protection that you will need from both the impacts and the rigidity of the cleat. There are a couple of OTC orthotic inserts that are often mentioned as fitting well in cleats: Currex CleatPros and Superfeet Carbon. We tried a couple of different Superfeet and found the Everyday Superfeet Insole (Green) to have the deepest heel cup and the most cushion for shock absorption. 

  • Tip #1: Orthotics and insoles are FSA/HSA eligible. (They can feel expensive, but then again, the visits to the orthopedists or podiatrists cost even more. We’re skipping those type of doctor visits in the future. Plus, they will just tell you to buy orthotics, too!)
  • Tip #2: When selecting orthotics, pay attention to:
    • the level of arch support, 
    • depth of heel cup, and 
    • the thickness of the insole to determine if it’s the right orthotic for you.
  • Tip #3: it’s easier to try orthotics in your cleats if it comes with a removable insole. However, it’s also possible to scrape out any glued on, out of the box insoles and slide in your orthotic inserts. See pic below.
soccer cleat insoles removed for orthotics
Glued on insoles removed from Firm Ground Nike Cleats

Stretch and Soften the Uppers

Stuff a compression or regular tennis ball or shoe-tree as far into the shoe as it can go. We were able to get into the lower toe area and leave it in for awhile. This can help resolve the squished pinky toe feeling to some degree and give a little more room in the toe box. This is player preference, but there’s a balance to be had between ball feel and painful toes.

Add Heel Lift or Heel Cup

Sometimes the orthotic insert isn’t enough shock absorption particularly on the heel. You can add a gel heel lift which increases the drop on the cleat, which is usually zero drop (i.e. completely flat). Sever’s and plantar fasciitis are common heel injuries that occur with cleat-wearing athletes. In both diagnoses, contributing factors include tight calf muscles, irritated heel pad, or muscles that just haven’t caught up in growth with the bones. A heel lift reduces the stretch on the calf muscle and heel cups can provide more shock absorption and support for the heel strike during activity. We ended up with the heel lift which I stuck to the shoe underneath the insert. Heel cups can sometimes be hard to get used to – my kids kept feeling like the cup was going to come out of the shoe, but they are also a popular option. 

Wear Cushioned Soccer Socks

Some soccer socks don’t come with extra cushioning, but many do. Cushioned socks just add that one more layer of shock absorption and some protection against blistering in cleats. 

Twist Before First Wear

I’m sure the boot guy does it for the pros. By that I mean, break in soccer shoes for fit and comfort.  On an episode of Amazon’s All or Nothing: Manchester United, the camera shows the boot room for the team and there’s an equipment guy giving all kinds of TLC to each of the players’ cleats. Wow, until my son turns pro, it’ll have to be his poor mom. Wring the cleat multiple times and knead the uppers until the shoes feel like they give more easily. Yeah, you could also let your kid break them in on the field, but then they may have a blister or two – depends on how much of a helicopter parent you are! 

Resources

Podiatrists weigh in on the problem with soccer cleats and offer advice:

Products we’ve used:

Common pains from soccer:

Reversing Myopia: Update #2

My last update about my experience trying to reverse my myopia was about 20+ months ago. For previous posts about my experience, please see: my first post and my first update. Today my 2nd update, in short, is that my vision still seems to be improving, but the improvement is quite slow when averaged out over 3.5 years – a 1.50 diopter improvement total in each eye when measured by my contact lens RX. See below for an updated chart and further notes about my experience:


Eye Exam Date
Glasses RX (from optometrist)Contact Lens RX (from optometrist)My Reduced Glasses RX for reversing myopia during this time
October 2018Corrected to see 20/15:
R: -8.00 w -0.50 astigmatism
L: -6.25 w -0.50 astigmatism
Corrected to see 20/20:
R: -7.50
L: -6.50
I first started wearing reduced lens June 2019:
R: -7.25 w -0.50 astigmatism
L: -6.00 w -0.50 astigmatism
End of Sept 2019Corrected to see 20/15:
R: -8.00, no more astigmatism
L: -6.25 w -0.50 astigmatism

Corrected to see just up to 20/20:
R: -7.5, no more astigmatism
L: -5.75 w -0.50 astigmatism
Corrected to 20/20:
R: -7.00
L: -6.00
In October 2019, I started wearing:
R: -7.25 
L: -6.00 
Early August 2020Corrected to see 20/15:
R: -7.5
L: -5.75 w -0.50 astigmatism

Corrected to see just up to 20/20:
R: -7
L: -5.75 (no astigmatism correction)
Corrected to 20/20:
R: -6.50
L: -5.25
In March 2020, I started wearing:R: -7.00 L: -5.75 
Nov 2021Corrected to see 20/20
R: -6.75 w -0.25 astigmatism
L: -5.75 
Corrected to 20/20:
R: -6.25
L: -5:25
In December 2021, I started wearing glasses:
R: -6.50
L: -5.25
Contacts:
R: -6.00
L: -5.00
July 2022 (haven’t visited optometrist yetNot available yetSeeing 20/20 with:
R: -6.00
L: -5.00

Notes on My Recent Experience with Reversing Myopia:

  • As I continue to reduce my glasses and contact RXs, my close vision seems to benefit so I still have no major need for bifocals or readers while most people my age are starting to have more trouble with small print.
  • I think I had trouble improving my right eye in years 2020 to 2021 because contact lenses above -6.00 don’t come in increments of -0.25, and so my left eye was always doing the heavy lifting. Finally, I tried reducing my left eye to match the blur in my right eye. I first started wearing contacts at the reduced lens of -6 and -5 in December 2021, seeing about 20/40. Things were slightly blurrier than I would like then, so I actually wore glasses with a -.25  lens for driving at night. Although that felt silly, it allowed me to wear contacts and get through the transition while my eyes slowly improved which took about 3-4 months to seeing 20/20 in daylight. I still don’t see 20/20 in dim lighting nor at nighttime. I haven’t measured it, but signs and people’s faces over 20 ft away are just slightly blurrier.
  • I haven’t done print pushing (Todd Becker method) or active focus (Jake Steiner method) consciously. My computer screen sits over 90cm from my eyes when I am working and when I’m outside, I make a conscious effort to constantly check how well I can read signs or see activities taking place at a distance. Maybe someone could improve faster with a more concerted effort, but at the moment I’m satisfied with the slow change with seemingly little effort.
  • Interesting comment from my optometrist: He said that young people tend to want to see super clear and their young eyes are able to do so. As a result, during a manual refraction, they will tend to pick the higher powers – this tends to lead to overcorrection in prescriptions.

IGE and Oral Immunotherapy (OIT): Sample Size of 2

I’ve received many questions about what the kids’ IGE numbers have been since they began oral immunotherapy. I was definitely curious when I was researching OIT and I like to see numbers too, so I’ve posted them below. Basically, the numbers trend downwards since OIT. Unfortunately, the numbers were already down from their peak before they began OIT (2019), so I won’t ever know if the continued downward trend is due to OIT or if they were on their way to becoming less allergic anyway. Below I list the raw data, and then graphed. I don’t have 2022 numbers, so check back after this summer for those.

Peanuts and IGE

YearTotal IGE (IU/mL)Peanut IGE (kU/L)Ara h 2 IGE (kU/L)F447-IGE Ara 6 IGE (kU/L)
20213588.358.884.51
202041317.314.8no data
(numbers right before OIT start) 201927918.717.3no data
2018420no data41no data
2017no datano data31.1no data
201689.211.623.7no data
20151195.19no datano data

Pistachios, Cashews, and IGE

YearTotal IGEPistachioCashew Component (F202)Cashew Component (F443-IGE Ana o 3)
20212971.211.260.91
20204482.512.631.85
(numbers right before OIT start) 20193263.412.841.9
20183652.182.251.56
2017no data4.353.62no data
20162681.921.45no data
2015no data3.673.08no data

 

Where to Dispose of Expired Epipens

Updated as of 10/18/22

I discovered that it was unbelievably difficult to properly dispose of expired and/or used Epipens, injectors, and medications. Here’s a summary of the first 50 Internet search results: “Take expired EpiPens to a doctor’s office, hospital, or pharmacy for disposal.”

NOT!!! Our local Walgreens wouldn’t take them. Our doctor’s office wouldn’t take them. Our local police station would only take old medications. Even our allergist’s office said no. I carried around a bag of our expired Epipens for a couple of years, trying to get these “drop-off locations” to take them. Our collection of expired Epipens and injectors was growing into a very large pile.

photo credit: Med-Project

How to Dispose of Expired or Used EpiPens

I eventually found a couple, more reliable resources:

#1 Med-Project, an organization that provides you with the packaging and an address to mail your disposal. Better than schlepping your expired EpiPens, back and forth across town. Depending on your location, they also provide a local list of mail back or drop off kiosks for other products like expired medications and inhalers.

Enter your zipcode on their site to see what your area’s options are:

https://med-project.org/

#2 Safe Needle Disposal, this resource for disposing of medical sharps would include your expired/used EpiPens):

https://safeneedledisposal.org/

Best Chinese Medicines

Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been a part of my American upbringing because my parents grew up under TCM principles and philosophies. Our family healthcare approach has evolved to be a mix of both Western and Chinese medicine along with some skepticism for each of them (see “5 Reasons Not to Rely on Doctors“). However, through generations of family trial and error, we’ve come to find a few Chinese herbal remedies that are popular, commonplace, and often more effective than Western options. Here are the top Chinese herbal remedies that sit in our medicine cabinet:

Best Chinese Medicine for Strains, Sprains, Bruising, and Soft Tissue Trauma: Yunnan Baiyao

Best Chinese Medicine for Strains, Sprains, Bruising, and Soft Tissue Trauma: Yunnan Baiyao
Yunnan Baiyao in powder form, photo credit: tiensproduct.com

Yunnan Baiyao is an ancient Chinese remedy for severe bleeding, trauma, bruises, sprains, strains, and pain and a whole lot more. A lot of Chinese herbal medicine is slow-acting, so it’s not easy to tell if and when they start to help. This is definitely not that kind of medicine – Yunnan Baiyao effects are almost immediate. It’s available in powder, capsule, and patch form. As I understand it, it keeps blood circulating (and not stagnating) through the applied area and also provides some pain relief. We’ve used this regularly for severe bruises, sprains, and fractures, but have not tried it for post-surgery recovery. With it, we’ve had significant swelling and sprains disappear in 1-2 days. We’ve also used the patch version for chronic, recurring pain – with about 80% success rate. There’s an interesting story behind this medicine that you can read about here. We would reach for this before any ice pack and are now using an integrative approach to speed up healing.

Best Chinese Medicine for Allergies and Sinus Infections: Bi Yan Pian

Chinese medicine Plum Flower brand, Bi Yan Pian works as  well as Zyrtec
Plum Flower brand, Bi Yan Pian

I came across this Chinese formula for allergies called Bi Yan Pian, when I was browsing this book, Between Heaven and Earth: A Guide to Chinese Medicine. It’s similar to this pediatric liquid extract herbal formula called Windbreaker which I had originally been giving my child. However, this has worked way, way better and faster. It seems to work even better than Zyrtec for both me and my child. The dosing instructions for the Plum Flower brand are 4 pills, 3x a day. However, I only need 4 pills once a day and my 8 year old takes 2 pills once a day whenever we experience symptoms. During our last allergy season, we would take them only after we started having hay fever symptoms, and the pills seemed to halt the symptoms within the hour. Zyrtec often doesn’t work for us after our symptoms have already started.

Best Chinese Medicine for UTIs: Ba Zheng Tang

Ba Zheng San or Tang seems to be the most effective remedy (in both Western and Eastern spheres) for UTIs
Ba Zheng Tang, liquid formula

Ba Zheng (Eight Rectification) San or Tang seems to be the most effective remedy (in both Western and Eastern spheres) for UTIs in our experience. I wish I had known about Ba Zheng (Eight Rectification) from the beginning when my mom first started having UTIs. The UTIs became chronic after regular antibiotic use. After years of trying tons of Western remedies (D-Mannose, premarin, antibiotics, garlic pills, oregano, cranberry, you name it), I saw this formula mentioned quite a lot in my research on Chinese medicine for UTIs. It seems to be a formula that specifically targets urinary symptoms and is used for acute UTIs. After 10 years of recurring UTIs every 4-6 months, my mother stopped her last two UTIs with this formula and hasn’t needed antibiotics in 2 years! It almost seems too good to be true. I’m guessing that overcoming the last two infections without antibiotics helped to stop the cycle of antibiotics to recurrent UTI. Berkeley Community Acupuncture has helpful information on how long and how often it could be taken. It’s not meant to be taken long term. If you can’t stand pills, I also found Ba Zheng in liquid formula.

Best Chinese Medicine for All Things Female: Dang Gui

Best Chinese Medicine for All Things Female: Dang Gui
Sliced dang gui root, photo credit: tcmwiki.com

Also known as Chinese Angelica Root, dong quai, or Angelicae Sinensis Radix. This is popular as the go-to herb for any female issues. It’s apparently beneficial for men’s health as well. We’ve used it for improving regularity of menses and reducing the side effects of hormonal imbalance that women naturally go through. Don’t take during menses (only in-between periods). 

Anecdotally, a friend of ours tested extremely anemic to the point that she was recommended to go through iron IV infusion. Before doing the IV, she decided to take iron pills (known to have poor absorption by the body) and dang gui for a few months first to see if she could get the numbers up without IV infusion (which can have some side effects). When she retested, she was no longer anemic and the hematologist said she could hardly believe the results as iron numbers don’t typically go up that fast through oral intake of iron pills. This is a strong- acting herb. It comes in pill form, but we have only ever used the dried root form brewed in soup. Here’s the basic recipe we use: Simple Dang Gui Soup or Tea Recipe.

Best Chinese Medicine for Immune System and Energy: Ginseng

Best Chinese Medicine for Immune System and Energy: Ginseng
Ginseng roots, photo credit: superfoodevolution.com

There’s American or Asian ginseng. We’ve only tried the Asian ginseng. I see it suggested for use in a variety of ailments, but in our family we take it for primarily overall vitality, energy, and immune system strength. In our family sample size, we’ve linked it to improved asthma and allergy reactions and general sense of well-being in both the kids and adults. Depending on your body’s constitution, some may find it too strong, akin to taking a dose of caffeine. As with dang gui, it is one of the stronger herbs and and it’s important to check the contraindications for it, as it really depends on your body type and needs. Definitely read the literature on it before taking, to see if it’s a good fit for your body’s needs. This also comes in natural dried root form, and in pill and extract forms. 

Best Chinese Medicine for Eye Health and Clearing Inflammation: Chrysanthemum

Best Chinese Medicine for Eye Health and Clearing Inflammation: Chrysanthemum
Dried white chrysanthemum flowers, photo credit: amazon.com

We take chrysanthemum flower in tea form, steeping the dried flower in hot water. To feel any benefits, you have to take it regularly for long periods of time. It’s indicated for clearing heat and inflammation in the body. There’s white or yellow chrysanthemum and they have different indications. White is mostly taken for eye health (dry eye, etc.) and visual acuity. Yellow for common cold-related symptoms. The most obvious benefit we’ve ever had from it was relief from dry eye and allergy-caused eye irritation. Here’s the basic recipe we use: Chrysanthemum and Goji Berries Tea Recipe for the Eyes

Best Chinese Medicine for Mouth Sores: Watermelon Frost

Best Chinese Medicine for Mouth Sores: Watermelon Frost
Watermelon frost, photos credit: suanie.net

Watermelon frost is available in spray or powder form and is indicated for canker sores and sore throats. We’ve only used it topically for sores in the mouth and it seems to reliably heal the sore quickly. I see many TCM/naturopathic practitioners recommending it for sore throats, so I may try that someday. 

Resources

Yunnan Paiyao

Other TCM for injuries (sprains, strains, bruising)

Bi Yan Pian

Ba Zheng

Dang Gui

Ginseng

Chrysanthemum

Watermelon Frost

Heal Fast and Prevent Recurring Pain

With two kids in contact sports and my own, easily injured, aging self, I’ve looked into ways to heal the body faster and avoid recurring pain and injury. This means doing more than just ice and rest to reduce recovery time. Below I’ve combined emerging practices from Western sports medicine and Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to heal soft tissue injuries

heal injuries fast
Heal an ankle sprain fast!
(photo credit: Vittori Foot and Ankle Specialist)

Don’t Use Ice on an Injury

Immediately after the injury, do not apply ice. In fact, do not apply ice at any point. Instead, apply some compression and massage to help ease the pain. Most Western sports medicine recommendations are to RICE (Rest, Ice, Compress, Elevate) and even many practitioners of TCM, acupuncturists, etc. will still recommend ice in the very first moments of an injury. 

However, in reviewing the literature, the use case for any healing benefits with ice is murky. In TCM, cold is an enemy to the body’s natural healing reaction and invasive to the body. Even in Western studies, there is recent research that suggests ice actually damages muscle fibers as highlighted in this New York Times article, “Ice for Sore Muscles? Think again.” Furthermore, even the original coiner of the term RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation), has recently come out against using ice at all in the healing process – except to numb the area and relieve initial pain. If there is so little benefit to using ice, and some possible damage – why bother at all with the ice?  

Integrative Treatment for Soft Tissue Injuries

In all stages of recovery, the guiding principle involves keeping the blood circulating properly and quickly through the area of injury as blood flow is the key to healing the area.  Certain tissues in the body have different levels of blood flow and that is why some tissues, like muscle, heal much faster than ligaments or cartilage. (Here again, ice would only serve to slow this process.)

TCM offers external application of herbal medicines as well as herbal medicines to be taken internally – all with the aim of circulating more blood through the injury. Emerging Western sports therapy recommends that patients work on continuing to move the area of injury almost immediately – they call this method, METH (Movement, Elevation, Traction, Heat)

For the first few days to weeks, depending on the severity of the injury:

  • Apply an external TCM. We apply the Yunnan Baiyao patch or spray continuously for the first few days. If there is an open wound in the area that makes the patch or dit da jow sting or uncomfortable, you can cover that small area with a nonstick pad or Tegaderm which will allow you to apply the spray, patch or medicinal wine to the non-open areas of the injury. If the area is not painful to massage, then in between applications of the Yunnan Baiyao, we also massage with a Chinese herbal liniment, dit da jow (though there are many types and brands to choose from), which purportedly also improves the circulation to that area. We taper off external application after the first 1-2 weeks. Towards the middle to end of recovery, we typically just do daily massage with dit da jow to the area. I did this diligently with a recent, moderate grade ankle sprain, and surprisingly did not go through the bruising stages.  
  • Take a Chinese herbal medicine that helps with improving blood flow throughout the body. In this category, I am only familiar with Yunnan Baiyao capsules or The Great Mender Tea Pills, although I have seen other products mentioned online. The product dosing typically recommends taking these medicines for just a few days to a week at a time, so in the initial stages of the injury. When ingesting Chinese herbal medicines, you should be cautious or check with a practitioner if you know one. Some can have contraindications and depending on dosage, may be too strong for your constitution. 
  • Keep the injured area moving and stretching as much as you are able without inducing pain. Elevate the area as appropriate to keep too much blood from stagnating / pooling at the injury. If you rest the injury too long, stiffness can settle in and make it more difficult to retain or regain mobility as the tissues heal. Google the METH method or MOVE method for guidance in this area. 
  • Apply a warm compress to the area, which can help with pain relief, and again, encourage blood flow to the injury. 

Integrative Treatment for Chronic Pain Avoidance 

Post-injury, not having a thorough recovery can lead to chronic problems in the area of the original injury. Towards the final days/weeks of recovery, I’ll feel that my injury is more or less recovered and I don’t want to mind it so much anymore. Just because you don’t feel pain anymore doesn’t mean your injury is fully healed. In fact, that final phase could be going on for quite some time.

I’ve learned that this phase is critical and long in terms of making sure the injury is thoroughly healed to avoid developing some chronic weaknesses, aches, pains, or arthritis in that injured area as we grow older or continue to be active. I suspect this phase could be as long as months or even years for many people, but that complete healing is possible.

Even though you may feel healed from your injury, it would be ideal to do the following:

  • Try to avoid allowing recent injured areas to be cold – even if it feels fine to you.
  • Massage with dit da jow on days where you might feel achy or if you used the formerly injured area a lot that day. 
  • Apply warm compress, keep the area warm as much as possible. People who tend to have cold hands / feet (which means poorer blood circulation to formerly injured extremities), keeping those areas warm in the last recovery stages can be particularly important.
  • Keep the area moving and stretching as much as possible as long as there is no pain. Protect or enhance your strength and range of mobility in that area. For example, some therapists recommend wearing a protective brace during exercise and doing preventative exercise for up to a year post ankle sprain. This probably feels like overkill when your injury feels healed, but it would likely prevent chronic pain long term.

Resources

Time it takes for different tissues to heal:

Stop the ice (study shows that ice can cause damage to the muscle fibers and could delay healing):

Western sports medicine starting to recommend METH or MOVE, over RICE as an approach for speedy and thorough recovery:

Posts on how to heal injuries quickly with TCM:

Posts on getting through the chronic stage with TCM or Western sports medicine:

TCM products for soft tissue injuries:

5 Tips for Reversing Myopia

In my experience so far with reversing myopia, I’ve learned a few things that have made a big difference for me. They’re mostly related to ways you can make this journey easier for yourself. If you’re still experimenting with reversing myopia, below are some tips you can consider, too. 

Tips for reversing myopia
Tips for reversing myopia

#1 Use the Eye Chart Regularly

Put up one or two eye charts in places that will be easy for you to use to check your vision casually and without much effort. (Get free printable eyecharts here.) This tip is actually CRITICAL because it keeps the idea of vision improvement in your mind and incorporates it into your daily routine without adding extra work. Without a convenient and well-placed eye chart, I think I would forget about checking my vision and give up. 

I put one up near my work space (directly behind my computer monitor), so that whenever I looked up from my work/screen, I could see how well I was seeing. The distance doesn’t matter so much as long as you have something of varying font sizes and an easy way to remember how well you are able to see certain sizes (20/40, 20/50, etc) from day to day, and time to time. With this method, you will almost effortlessly start to notice how your vision changes based on the close up work that you do: reading a book versus reading on your phone versus working on your computer. Glance at the chart before you even start working – I found that my vision is often better after I’ve been outside driving or playing racket sports. 

#2 Pay Attention to How Well You Are Seeing

Pay attention to your vision everyday or as often as you can. If your vision is getting worse, you’ll catch this sooner and have a better opportunity to adjust habits that may be contributing to the deterioration. Small +/- changes in vision seem not to be always permanent initially. Conversely, if your vision is improving, then consider what might be helping. 

Check your eyes separately. Pay attention to how your vision in each eye differs. Pay attention to whether words become more clear if you focus your eye on it longer. Or if you see a word clearly and slowly back away from it, does it stay clear? And for how long? People’s eyes work together in different ways. I have one eye that seems to always improve faster than the other one. When your vision varies, think about what factors may have changed it. More sleep or less sleep? Less screen time? Reading more or less or for a long period of time? Or even the sequence of wearing contacts first, followed by wearing your glasses later during the day. Interestingly, I have found that I can see noticeably better in reduced RX glasses if I wore contact lenses (at a higher relative RX) during the daytime.

#3 Use a Computer Monitor

Use a monitor instead of a laptop screen and place it as far as is realistic for you and your screen size. This could also reduce eye strain, not to mention the superior ergonomics of the position. With a monitor so far, I think I may be doing some light variation of print pushing (a method articulated by a fellow named Todd Becker) without realizing it. I currently have a 27” screen that is placed about 90cm, 3ft from my eyes. I’m not the first person to have thought of this, and I recently came across this article on endmyopia.org which is a popular reversing myopia website.  My husband thinks I’m nuts, but I used the same set up for my kids through the Zoom school pandemic and while it looked stupid, at least their eyes didn’t become more myopic during that period. (Luck of the draw or careful attention to eye breaks and screen time/distance, we’ll never know!)

#4 You Can Reverse Myopia While Wearing Contacts

You can continue to wear contacts regularly and still use the reduced RX method to “work” on vision improvement. I got tired of wearing my glasses so often (I’m quite myopic, my glasses were heavy, and it was hard to play sports). I learned that I could buy contacts without an RX on https://www.visiondirect.co.uk/no-prescription-needed, so I didn’t necessarily need an optometrist exam every time I wanted to adjust my RX. Then I bought one pair of inexpensive glasses with a mild -0.25 RX (from zennioptical.com), so I could see better for driving or for any other time when you would like to see a bit more clearly.  

#5 Have Patience

Maybe you’ll be lucky and be one of those people I’ve read about online who seem to experience drastic, quick improvements. In general, though, you really need to adopt the mindset that this process will take place over a long period of time. If you’re the impatient type, trying to reverse your myopia or at least with the reduced lens method, is probably not for you! My experience feels painstakingly slow. I recently wore a reduced RX for almost a year without seeing any change and then out of the blue, I started seeing 20/15 periodically and now almost daily. I’m guessing that will amount to just -.50 improvement this recent year. 

Overall, the more convenient you make the process for yourself and the more you incorporate mindful vision habits, the easier it will become for you to continue trying to improve your vision!

How to Be a Happier Parent

When I saw the title, “How to Be a Happier Parent” at my local library, I was curious. It certainly wouldn’t hurt to be happier! Written by KJ Dell’Antonia who is a former editor of a New York Times parenting column, the book has chapters on dealing with pain points, called: Mornings, Chores, Siblings, Sports and Activities, Homework, Screentime, Discipline, etc.  

Even though it’s not the main or only message of the book, my biggest takeaway from this book is that taking care of myself will make me a happier parent. I used to poo-poo this idea when my children were younger, and in road warrior-fashion, I made sure that my kids should always come first. However, I’m a little older now, worse for wear, panting to keep up with the kids, and finally starting to realize that even if I want to put my kids first all the time – that actually means that I need to be my best self – first. So, how to do this?

“How to Be a Happier Parent” by KJ Dell’Antonia

Sleep

Duh. Getting enough sleep seems like a no-brainer, but I don’t think sleep makes it to many parents’ priority list as much as it should, mine included. Dell’Antonia brings sleep up in relation to mornings which are rushed and chaotic because so much can be out of our control at that time. However, she declares that there’s one thing that for many people is more controllable about those mornings – and that’s SLEEP.  (Incidentally, I struggle with RBP, revenge bedtime procrastination. If you’ve never heard of RBP, but you often stay up later than you should, check to see if you have RBP too!) 

But sleep is critical to more than just the morning. I find that being a better and therefore, happier parent, HINGES ALMOST ENTIRELY on getting enough sleep! If I just wasn’t so sleep-deprived and tired all the time, then I would have more energy to do all the hard things like setting limits, following up on chores, and disciplining consistently. Everything is so much easier to handle when you’re not sleep-deprived and not dragging every afternoon. 

Find Your Own Thing

In the book’s chapter on Sports and Activities, I also particularly valued the author’s idea of “finding your own thing.” It’s tempting to lose myself in doing everything in the name of my children’s advancement. But one day, they’ll look at me, and wonder, why should I listen to her? What does Mom do for her own improvement?

More loosely, finding your own thing is really about having time to do your own thing or to develop yourself. This can seem like a luxury – but I think we can try to more consciously incorporate this into our lives by using time differently: 

  • Think about your work differently and ways you can gain more skills or knowledge at your job, no matter how small the activity – while you are at work
  • Work on a skill or activity during your kids’ activities – if you have just an hour to kill, use some of the time to exercise, read, or practice, etc.
  • If you’re with the kids, try to learn whatever it is that they’re learning – the exercise of pushing your own cognitive development is important
  • When you have child-free time, try to avoid household chores, administrative tasks, and family errands. Use most of that time for self-improvement and self-care.

While reflecting on “finding your own thing,” I concluded that I have to protect and value my own learning and growth as a person – whether for my career or personal development. This serves multiple purposes: 

  • I improve as a person.
  • I teach my children that they are not the center of the universe.
  • I model for them how a person can continually learn and try to better themselves. They can learn from seeing how I practice and put hard work into what I’m interested in doing. 
  • The better I feel about how my own life and interests are progressing, the more patience, strength, and energy I will have in helping my children with their challenges.  

Of course, my willpower and ability to do any of this is greatly enhanced by getting enough SLEEP. See how everything spawns from sleep?  Since reading this book, I’ve been working deliberately on both sleep and self-development and I’d like to say that I’ve been calmer, more productive, and more purposeful. . . maybe even happier.

Changing Jobs? Check the Impact to Your Medical Benefits

changing jobs, HSA, FSA, health benefits, job benefits
Image credit: events.ibx.com

Updated as of 2/22/22

If you’re changing jobs, don’t forget to think about how to coordinate your benefits between the two jobs, so that:

  1. you’re not without coverage between the two 
  2. you maximize your benefits
  3. you minimize any forfeits in FSAs
  4. you coordinate your HSA contributions and providers

(If you’re wanting to compare plans at your new job, check this post on health insurance plan comparison spreadsheets.)

Below are the main things that I’ve learned to check during job changes:

Fill the insurance gap between jobs

  • If you and your partner are each insured through different employers, then whoever is losing insurance is considered to be having a qualifying event – which means the remaining insured partner will be able to enroll you into their insurance plan regardless of the time of year.
  • When leaving your job, make sure you know how long your benefits will last. Check if all benefits will extend through the end of the month or if they cease immediately on resignation. Apparently, this can vary by employer. 
  • If you are ending a job and starting another job in the same month, you may not have any gap in coverage. Confirm with the benefits providers in each job about the termination date of the coverage in the current job with the effective date of your benefits coverage in your new job.
  • If there is a coverage gap of any amount of days, it’s always safest to buy some sort of coverage for those days. You will have to do a cost risk analysis on your own situation. You have 3 main options:
    • COBRA insurance, which is pretty much an extension of your current coverage except that your employer no long pays for any of it, so it is usually very expensive. 
    • Short term insurance – which can vary in cost but is usually the cheapest option, because it is essentially catastrophic insurance, to minimize the financial impact if you were to unexpectedly have any major medical costs during your gap days. Remember to always review the insurance terms in detail as these plans all have different levels of coverage, too.
    • Standard health insurance, including Affordable Care Act (ACA) plans – the cost of these plans are usually less than COBRA costs, but more than short term plans. However, you should always check all the costs before selecting. 

Your age, your family size, your medical needs, your risk threshold, and expected duration of time between jobs will determine the best choice for you. 

Maximize Your Benefits

Timing of routine, preventative services 

If you will have any sort of gap between coverage, it’s always safest to take advantage of any preventative doctor or dental visits before your coverage ends. This minimizes the likelihood of your needing to pay out of pocket for routine checks. 

Timing of non-covered benefits 

Conversely, if you are close to changing plans and haven’t met your deductible, then you may be better off delaying (if possible) costs that could contribute to your new deductible rather than your old one which you most likely won’t meet at the end of your current coverage. 

Timing of benefits that are capped

If you have any benefits where only a certain amount is covered per plan or plan year, then you may want to use them before switching. For example, vision plans often cover $150 per year in contact lenses or glasses. Even if you don’t need the contact/glasses yet, you should stock up or you would just be losing $150. In your new job, you may have a new plan that provides another $150 to use – essentially giving you a $300 contacts/glasses benefit for that one year. 

Check the latest FSA and HSA rules

Finally, doublecheck the rules on your FSA and HSA – there are often updates to these rules. It’s no wonder that the FSA and HSA are often under-utilized by people because they can be such a pain to track. Always recheck the rules each time you change jobs to make sure you know the latest. In 2022, here are some things to know about the FSA and HSA when changing jobs.

Regular FSA during job change

Your FSA must be used up – they don’t transfer to the next employer, so you should spend it all before you leave. However, the medical FSA plan limit is per employer and not per year, so even if you maxed out with your first employer, you are eligible for the maximum amount again with your new employer ($2850 in 2022). 

HSA during job change

Your HSA funds are not impacted by changing jobs. Whatever you have is yours to keep and use as needed for qualified medical expenses. You can roll it over to another HSA provider or continue to use it through your existing provider. 

However, you do have to be careful about how much you contribute. The annual maximum amount per individual or family has to be pro-rated for each month that you are eligible to contribute (e.g. that you are enrolled in a high-deductible, HSA eligible plan). Therefore, if your new job provides HSA eligibility or no longer provides it, you will have to adjust your monthly contributions accordingly. This PDF from Benefit Strategies, LLC and this post on the Finance Buff provide helpful information on mid-year changes and HSA eligibility and contributions.

Also note that some employers contribute towards your HSA – these amounts count towards your annual HSA limits. Don’t forget to account for employer contributions when calculating how much you will contribute while still not exceeding the limit.

Limited-purpose FSA (LPFSA) during job change

This is the FSA that you’re allowed to have if you also elect the HSA and is only usable towards vision and dental expenses. Like the regular FSA, it must be used up when changing jobs – they don’t transfer to the next employer, so you should spend it all before you leave unless you feel like gifting your employer. However, again as with the medical FSA, your plan limit is per employer and not per year, so even if you maxed out with your first employer, you are eligible for the maximum amount again with your new employer ($2850 in 2022).

Dependent Care FSA during job change

Dependent care FSA – I found some conflicting answers on this one and basically, it is up to your employer. Some employers allow you to use your funds through the end of the plan year. Others will require that you use it up or forfeit it upon departure. You will have to check with your employer. In 2020-21, there were COVID-related changes to the dependent care FSA that you should definitely check on with your employer. In fact, after doing this research, I’ve decided to check these specific terms with any new employers, so I know what I’m getting into when I sign up for the dependent care FSA. By the way, don’t forget that dependent care FSA expenses can include after school care, summer camps, as well as family members who babysit for you!

Do you have other tips to share? Email me at wishiknewbefore20@gmail.com or add them to the comments below!

Resources

Filling in the gap

Maximizing benefits in all categories

HSA and mid-year changes

LPFSA

Dependent care FSA

Raising Your Child to Be a Champion

  • Cultivate Interest – Less is More
  • Hold Your Ground as a Parent
  • Nurture a Second Passion 

The title of my recent read is a bit misleading for its true value – bold letters state “Raising Your Child to be a Champion” and in smaller letters, “in Athletics, Arts, and Academics.” This seemingly trite, short, and simple parenting book is authored by Wayne Bryan, the father of the Bryan twins, who grew up to be world doubles champions in men’s tennis. There’s not much scientific evidence backed strategies, but instead, refreshingly straightforward, actionable ideas from a dad who found success with his approach and philosophy. I liked a lot of his practical advice, and I find myself considering three of his ideas (below) in particular.

 Cultivate Interest - Less is More 
 Hold Your Ground as a Parent 
 Nurture a Second Passion 
Raising Your Child to Be a Champion by Wayne Bryan

1) Cultivate Interest – Less is More

Bryan reminds us about keeping it fun and using games or related fun activities to cultivate interest or passion in a child. This is pretty common knowledge. It was his idea that less is more that was intriguing to me. Bryan suggests spending just enough time on an activity that leaves them wanting more. For example, he would stop tennis practice early for his kids, leaving them hungry for more opportunities to play another time. 

It’s not intuitive, yet I think it works to some degree, even when they don’t have that intrinsic interest. Sometimes, there’s a subject matter or skill that you might feel is valuable for your child to learn, but they’re not interested. I only “let” my kids practice piano for 15 minutes a day (they don’t love the piano), but it seems to keep them from being over saturated with it. For the kids who do have a passion, a tempered approach would help to keep them from mentally or physically burning out early.

2) Hold Your Ground as a Parent

Bryan has a story about how his twins wanted to play video games like their friends so badly that they proposed a one year plan of doing daily chores in return for getting to play video games for 1 hour every Friday night. He was against the idea of any easily accessible video games or TV, but incredibly, the kids accomplished their one year goal and Bryan got them a game. Behind their father’s back, they broke their 1 hour/week promise within the month and started to prioritize game playing over sports, academics, and music. When Bryan realized, he got rid of the games forever. Sounds a bit extreme on both ends, but when I feel badgered and too tired to hold out on my kids’ constant requests, I actually think of his story to help me dig my heels in and say no to the kids. (I feel comforted that I’m not the only parent to hold off screen time and video games, ha.) For us right now, it’s NO to new toys, extra snacks, video games, more screen time, etc. I’m sure there’s a plethora of other things on which I’ll need to stand my ground as the kids get older.

3) Nurture a Second Passion 

Being intentional with fostering a second passion wasn’t something that I had really thought about, but Bryan writes that it can be very valuable to a child’s development. Kids can be interested in a lot of different things and so while we may support them in all of these interests, it may actually be even better if we consciously help them to build a second passion as well (more than just an interest). 

Bryan views this second passion as something a person can fall back to when things aren’t working out well in their first passion – a second passion is something that counterbalances the first passion, and maybe strengthens the other side of their brain. When his twins had a tough time with tennis, they could go to their music. He writes that the famous actress, Kaley Cuoco (known for The Big Bang Theory)  would fall back to competitive tennis during difficult periods in her early acting career. 

While I’m not raising any elite athletes, I definitely see the benefits of how being skilled or knowledgeable in more than one thing supports my children’s self-confidence and takes the edge off of disappointments or injuries in other sports and activities. 

All in all, I’ve got these takeaways in mind as we emerge from the pandemic and are faced again with modern day’s multitude of activities to choose for the kids. It’s an opportunity to rethink as well as become more intentional with my choices and my parenting.

Chinese Herbal Medicine for UTIs

You may have tried a lot of different things to treat UTIs by now (e.g. D-mannose, garlic, cranberry, oregano, etc.). We certainly have, and have battled UTIs for 10 years without lasting success. In yet another bid to avoid antibiotics which cause all kinds of issues, I’ve looked into how Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) might help. Since both my kids seemed to resolve their problems (cough-variant asthma and clammy/sweaty hands respectively) with a tailored course of CHM, we decided to try Chinese herbal medicine to treat UTIs as well. In this post, I share a list of formulas I found and share our experience with taking some of them successfully!

Why Chinese Herbal Medicine Could Treat UTIs

In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) theory, people may present with similar UTI symptoms, while the causes for the symptoms are often different for each person. Sometimes they are a constellation of causes. For a UTI, you could even think of the overgrowth of the bacteria (E. coli or proteus mirabilis) as one of the symptoms rather than the cause itself. For people without UTIs, they are exposed to those UTI-causing bacteria all the time, too, however, their bodies just don’t allow the bacteria to take root or multiply enough to cause an infection.

In this context, a Chinese herbal formula, (which may or may not have some antibacterial or anti-inflammatory properties) also tries to address the weaknesses that allow the bacteria to flourish. These weaknesses vary from person to person. They can be a weakened immune system, an imbalance of hormones, lack of estrogen, a weak liver function, or a weak kidney function. TCM typically sees UTI symptoms as damp heat in the lower body. Damp heat is a distinctly TCM term, but just think of it as the state of a physical environment that’s conducive to the growth of mold, other allergens or bacteria – except in this case, that physical environment is in your body. 

Common TCM Formulas that Treat UTIs

I found the formulas (listed in this section) to appear most frequently on various TCM practitioners’ or TCM-related websites when I searched for Chinese herbal medicines to treat UTIs. Most of these herbal medicines appear to be targeted towards clearing damp heat in the lower body. Some are targeted more towards hormonal/menstrual regulation, and others help to reduce inflammation. Some seem to address an endless variety of symptoms. 

Chinese herbal formulas for UTIs, from L to R: Zhi Bai Di Huang, Ba Zheng Wan, Long Dan Xie Gan Tang, Ba Zheng Tang

Here are the formulas that I came across most often:

  • Ba Zheng (Eight Rectification) – I saw this formula mentioned quite a lot and seems to be a formula that specifically targets urinary symptoms and is used for acute UTIs. We tried this and it worked! Unfortunately, while the UTI symptoms disappeared, it also caused a lot of diarrhea in my sample size of one (an elderly female). However, my data point also happens to have a sensitive digestive system, so you may not have the same experience. Berkeley Community Acupuncture had helpful information on how long and how often it could be taken. It’s not meant to be taken long term. If you can’t stand pills, I also found Ba Zheng in liquid formula.
  • Er Xian  (Two Immortals) – this formula seems more commonly used for menopausal symptoms. However, some research indicated that it was also recommended by some TCM practitioners for preventing recurring UTIs.
  • Long Dan Xie Gan (Gentiana) – this formula is targeted at liver health and seems to be recommended for acute UTIs with pain.
  • Zhi Bai Di Huang (Anemarrhena, Phellodendron and Rehmannia Formula) – this formula is known to address menopausal symptoms and boost kidney function. It can be taken long term, and was listed as a formula suitable for chronic UTI sufferers.
  • San Jin Pian (Three Gold Tablets)  this was mentioned in some of the clinical studies and seemed to have good potential for effectiveness. On a separate UTI occurrence, we tried this one too. It didn’t seem to work for us, but did cause diarrhea.

Final Notes to Keep in Mind When Trying a Formula

Formula name conventions – note that when searching for a formula, each formula name ends with either a Pian/Wan/Tang/San. These are Chinese terms for the form that the formula comes in and corresponds, in order, to tablets/teapills/decoctions/granules.

Best used immediately – Through my reading, as well as witnessing the experiences of an elderly female, I think that TCM formulas are best used immediately at the first sign of symptoms or in conjunction with antibiotics. It seems that after a certain amount of time, too much bacterial growth or inflammation has occurred for TCM formulas alone to overcome. While some formulas are anti-bacterial in nature, I don’t know if any would be as strong and sweeping as an antibiotic. Some research has found that simultaneous use of CHM and antibiotics to significantly reduce the rate of recurring UTIs. This suggests that while CHM may not be able to overcome a raging infection, it can balance your body’s internal environment to make it less conducive to bacterial growth afterwards.

Finding the right formula  for you may largely depend on accurately diagnosing your own individual causes for the UTI.  A good TCM practitioner can probably help you with that and can also modify these well-known formulas to even more specifically tailor them to your particular needs. However, seeing a practitioner can cost upwards of $200, not including follow up visits, etc., which may or may not be covered by health insurance. I don’t have any great ideas for addressing that cost because even after researching a lot of the material online, I didn’t have enough experience with the herbs or diagnosing a person’s health from a TCM perspective to feel confident in my assessments.

Nevertheless, we tried to skip working with a TCM practitioner, and did some trial and error. Then we tried a TCM practitioner who couldn’t seem to diagnose accurately enough. Finally, after the Ba Zheng Wan caused diarrhea while simultaneously curing the UTI, I felt that it would be worth trying yet another TCM practitioner to get a more customized formula that was easier on the digestive system. Additionally, we were interested in finding a suitable, long-term formula for addressing the body’s imbalances since we suspected that these imbalances were at the root of the recurring UTIs. 

As of this post’s date, we have managed to avoid antibiotics for 6 months, while addressing two flare-ups with CHM instead. If you’re a fellow UTI sufferer, you know how that feels! Fingers crossed!! 

Resources

This research suggests that Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) can help reduce the rate of recurring UTIs and has a role in treating UTI symptoms:

A review of clinical studies on CHM and UTIs:

A TCM practitioner recommendations for UTI treatment (primarily recommended San Jin Wan and Ba Zheng Wan):

Online Chinese herbal medicine storefront with nice write up explaining TCM view of UTIs and different types of formulas that might work:

Online post about UTI and treatments including TCM:

Lowest Price for EpiPens

Updated as of 11/4/22

We have food allergies and we need to carry around EpiPens. But we also have a high-deductible HSA-eligible health insurance that doesn’t cover very much, so below is a rundown of the options I went through to find the best price for EpiPens. My takeaway is that if you can’t get an EpiPen or EpiPen alternative for free, you should only pay up to the low $100s in the U.S. See the rundown of options below.

(This fall of 2022, I had to fill our EpiPen RX at Walgreens for $109 with a GoodRX coupon. The GoodRX price is only if you don’t use insurance. In prior years, I bought Auvi-Q which was available at $25 for those with poor insurance coverage, but that Auvi-Q price went up to $125 in October 2022. All of this is ridiculous, isn’t it?)

EpiPen size comparison
In case you’re curious, an EpiPen size comparison: (L to R) Auvi-Q, Adrenaclick, Mylan/generic EpiPen

#1 Health Insurance EpiPen Cost

When we had excellent health insurance, I was able to buy a pack of two generic EpiPens for as little as $30. I’ve also seen online that some people have health insurance that can bring the cost down to $0-$5. 

Unfortunately, now that we have health insurance with a very high deductible, those generic Epipens would cost me $476. I detest anything associated with health insurance these days, so even if I could afford $476 for epipens, I would do my best to avoid this option.

#2 EpiPen Manufacturer Discount

On the Mylan brand name EpiPen website, you can get a savings card for up to $300 on brand name Epipen, and a savings card of $25 on generic EpiPens. However, you’re only eligible for these savings cards if you also have commercial health insurance:  

“The Epipen Savings Card® helps eligible patients who have commercial health insurance save on out-of-pocket costs.”  

– Mylan website

And in fine, fine print, Massachusetts or California residents are not eligible. At any rate, if I were eligible for the savings card of $25, my generic EpiPens would now cost $451 instead of $476. The search continues. . .

(FYI, the brand name Mylan EpiPen and the generic EpiPen look and work exactly the same. The EpiPen alternatives operate a little differently.) 

#3 EpiPen Alternatives

There are a few other EpiPen alternatives. You would need to get your doctor to write you an RX specifically for one of these alternatives. 

  • Adrenaclick – about 6 years ago, this was the wonderboy of EpiPen alternatives because CVS offered them for as little as $10 (I don’t remember the fine print of this offer). However, without insurance, it’s now offered at a retail price of ~$110 at Target/CVS pharmacies. You can also print out a $10 savings card that should bring you to ~$100. 
  • Auvi-Q – our allergist suggested trying Auvi-Q. This is the EpiPen alternative that talks you through the process. It has a retail price of $4500 that nobody actually pays. I called the Auvi-Q customer service number and learned that they have contracted with a direct delivery pharmacy called ASPN Pharmacies. To start the process for direct delivery service, call them or complete this direct delivery enrollment form. The pharmacy itself has mixed reviews. (My personal experience was that it took me about 2.5 weeks and two followup phone calls to get the EpiPens.) However, the ASPN representative told me the following:
    • If you have commercial health insurance AND YOUR INSURANCE COVERS the Auvi-Q, then the cost will be $0, even if you have a high insurance deductible.
    • If you have commercial health insurance AND YOUR INSURANCE DOES NOT COVER the Auvi-Q, then the cost will be $125. (In October 2022, this cost increased from $25 in prior years to $125 this fall!)
    • If you need more than one pack of 2, you can order a second one for the same price after a 30 day waiting period.
    • For those without insurance, they offer a patient assistance option if you complete this patient assistance form. If you don’t qualify for financial assistance, they say that the most anyone should have to pay for Auvi-Q is capped at $360. At that price, you would be better off with a Adrenaclick or the generic EpiPen options through GoodRx and the like (see #4 below).
  • Symjepi – I’m not familiar at all with this option, but I saw it listed on the GoodRX website as an Epipen alternative. Pricewise, I didn’t see any quotes that made it a better deal than the Adrenaclick or Auvi-q. I’m not sure there is any point to considering this option seriously.

#4 Prescription Cost Saving Websites for EpiPen

There are a lot of prescription cost saving websites out there now that can offer prices in the low $100s. To get these discounts, you search the name of the drug and the website returns an out of pocket cost comparison of the Rx’s cost at local pharmacies, along with a coupon that you can use at the pharmacy. These are the costs of the EpiPen if you pay without using insurance.

Here are a few of the sites I looked at. The costs below are based on my local zip code, so may be different for you. This is what I found for 1 pack of 2 generic epinephrine auto-injectors: 

#5 Your Allergic Friend with Good Health Insurance 

It also crossed my mind to ask if any of my allergic buddies with good health insurance wouldn’t mind just calling in a refill for me to pick up. I figure that would be about $30 and without the kids in school, I really don’t need an RX in their names. Just throwing this idea out there. . .

#6 Expired Epipens

You either already have expired Epipens or you have friends that do. I think I’ve never felt that comfortable with expired Epipens, knowing that I carry them around in all sort of temperatures that could lead to its degradation in performance. However, if they’ve been stored safely, they could very well be perfectly useful, so you may keep that in consideration in terms of how many new Epipens you may want to buy. A study in 2019 showed that even Epipens that were 30 months past their expiration date were still effective. (See here if you’re trying to figure out how to dispose of them.)

Resources

Articles summarizing EpiPen costs:

Auvi-Q

Epipen

Adrenaclick

Goji Berry Chocolate Muffins

This is a muffin that is like a chocolate cupcake, mixed with some goji berries and whole wheat that make you feel like it’s slightly healthier. Goji berries are a bittersweet berry that are supposedly a superfood.  We normally snack on them or put them in chrysanthemum tea, but I wanted to give the kids a little variety in how we get this superfood, so I made Goji Berry Chocolate Muffins.

Goji Berry Chocolate Muffins
Goji Berry Chocolate Muffins

Ingredients

Makes 12 muffins / cupcakes

  • 1 ¼  cup all-purpose flour
  • ¼ cup whole wheat flour
  • ½ cup cacao powder
  • 2 tbsp cornstarch (optional – I added this to make it more “cake-like,” but you’d be fine without)
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • 2 eggs
  • ½ cup of sweetener (Really, any sweetener like sugar, maple syrup, brown sugar, etc. We generally find commercial sweets to be too sweet for our palates. If you do too, then use ½ cup of sweetener. If you prefer things sweeter, then use 1 cup.)
  • ½ cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup sour cream 
  • ½ tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 cup of hydrated goji berries (These usually come dried, so hydrate them for 5 minutes in hot water and drain.)
  • ¼ cup – ½ cup of chocolate chips (your sweet tooth preference!)

Directions

  1. Mix the flours, cacao powder, cornstarch, salt, and baking soda in one bowl. 
  2. In a larger bowl, stir together the eggs, sugar, oil, and vanilla. 
  3. Mix in the dry ingredients. 
  4. Gradually stir in the sour cream until mixed. 
  5. Stir in the goji berries and chocolate chips.
  6. Spoon batter into a lined muffin tin. (Batter should be thick enough to use an ice cream scooper, which makes this part easier and faster!)
  7. Bake at 400 degrees F for 20 minutes.

Eye Massage and Eye Acupressure Points for Myopia

I reviewed some online literature on eye massage to add to my repertoire of things to try for slowing / reversing myopia. As an acupressure layman, I found the acupressure points and techniques seemed to vary just enough from site to site to confuse me initially. Finally, I cobbled together some basics. 

(Note: there are also eye exercises and acupressure points on other parts of the body that directly affect the eyes. I think I will have to review those thoroughly another time.)

My basic takeaway

  • The theory is that eye massage improves the blood circulation to the eyes and relaxes the eye muscles. Tight eye muscles are understood to eventually contribute to myopia. 
  • Eye acupressure is practiced regularly in schools in China, but studies haven’t been conclusive about their benefits on myopia and I’m not sure that any studies could ever be conclusive. After all, how could they really know if the kids were doing the massage correctly? Plus, there are so many other factors that may also affect myopia progression. 
  • You have to be able to do this pretty regularly for some duration to judge whether there is any benefit to you. 
  • I don’t get the feeling that eye massage could slow myopia down significantly on its own but perhaps it would be helpful as a supplement to other methods like myopia control.

Acupressure points for myopia

I cross-checked the acupressure points that children were taught to use in some of the myopia and acupressure studies with some other articles that I found about acupressure for improving vision and eye health. Below are the points (and diagram of what) I found. I listed all the variations in naming that I came across:

  • BL2 / Zan Zhu / Cuanzhu / 攢竹 – located on the inner end of the eyebrow
  • EX-HN5 / Tai Yang / 太阳 – located on the flat sides of the temple
  • BL1 / Jing Ming / 睛明 – located in the inner corner of your eyes
  • ST1 / Cheng Qi / 承泣 – located directly below the pupil between the eyeball and the intraorbital ridge. A questionable source, Dr. Deborah Banker identified this as the access point for the ciliary muscle. Although her credibility is unclear, the ST1 point is indeed frequently mentioned as an important acupressure point. 
  • ST2 / Si Bai / 四白 – located on the depression of the infraorbital foramen below ST1, about where the nostrils begin
  • Tianying / Ashi – I could only find mention of this point twice, but I included it because it was mentioned in articles that were specifically dealing with myopia.  It seems to be located vertically between BL2 and BL1. It is also the first point referred to in this video by Dr. Grace Tan, whose credentials seemed legit (if you are open to TCM). The Dr. Banker article stated that this point could manipulate the superior oblique muscle which is a muscle that can cause the eye shape to change.
  • Series of points covered by scraping along the eyebrow and just below the lower lash line, points which were included in both of the studies of Chinese students and also an easy to follow video of Dr. Grace Tan performing the massage
    • ST1 (see above)
    • TE-23 /Sizhukong / 丝竹空 – located on the outer end of the eyebrow
    • BL2 (see above)
    • EX-HN4 / Yuyao / 鱼腰 – located in the middle of the eyebrow in the hollow, directly above the pupil
    • GB1 / Tongziliao / 瞳子髎 – located on the outer corner of the eye
Eye acupressure points for myopia
Eye acupressure points for myopia

How to do acupressure on the eye points

For each of the points, there were different recommendations for what to do – it seems that you could do either a circular massage or a press and release: 

  • Circular motion – This is a circular kneading motion on the point with your fingers. Apply gentle pressure at the same time as kneading.
  • Press and release – Press at a 90 degree angle for 10-30 seconds and slowly release. Do this for a couple of minutes for each point. If you prefer a more precise time prescription, you’ll just have to make it up as I found a range in my review of the literature. 
  • Scraping – Apply light pressure and sweep your fingers along your brow line and below your bottom lash line. This encompasses stimulation of multiple points around the eyes.

Resources

Research on whether eye exercise or massage can be helpful:

Identifies different eye acupressure points and talks about the specific eye problems that they may address:

Explains how to do the acupressure:

Videos that show how to do eye acupressure:

Thoughts? More info? Better info? I’m all ears. Email me at:  wishiknewbefore20@gmail.com or leave a comment below.

My Favorite Free Printables

Since the pandemic began, I’ve been supplementing home learning for the kids here and there. I’ve found a few free printables that we really like – because they print well, and have an interface that is easy to use.

(There are a lot of interactive sites that can supplement learning as well, but with all the Zoom and other digital resources that the schools are requiring the children to use, I’m trying to dial it back and reduce screen time for the kids.

Here’s a running list in the various categories of what I’ve found and used:

Favorite Free Math Printables

Both of the math sites listed here provide a lot of different printable worksheets that go up to at least 5th grade. I see calculus topics on Math Aids, and if I remember correctly – that would be high school!

  • https://www.math-aids.com/  – I use Math Aids quite a lot to give my kids the practice with basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division that they don’t get with common core at school. I think it helps them to understand the common core approaches better. There are a wide range of math topics on the site though that we haven’t reached at my kids’ age.
  • https://www.math-salamanders.com/ – I’ve used Math Salamanders less than Math Aids but I liked the mental math problems and it has a similar interface to Math Aids. A large variety of worksheets in a large range of math topics are available.
  • I used the blank multiplication chart on https://www.memory-improvement-tips.com/  to teach my kids their times tables. There are a variety of well laid out charts to choose from. The site also seems to have other cool brain games and memory improving techniques that I hope to explore more someday.
mathaids
math-aids.com Division section

Favorite Free Geography and Map Printables

https://online.seterra.com/ – We just started some geography and I found this awesome site called Seterra, for free, professional-looking blank maps for the seven continents to teach the kids all the countries of the world. The printables were just a minor part of the site. The site is an extensive free resource of games and resources on world geography.

Seterra

Favorite Free Comic Book Template Printables

http://allfreeprintable.com/blank-comic-book-template – My kids’ latest passions are in graphic novels and comic books, so of course they wanted to write their own books, too.

ComicBook
Just one of a variety of comic book templates from http://allfreeprintable.com/blank-comic-book-template

Favorite Free Chinese Learning Printables

Since extracurriculars have been cut down so much with the pandemic, we’ve been doing more Chinese lessons at home and these two printables are wonderful.

  • http://chineseprintables.com/  – This straightforward site called Chinese Printables allows you to print grid paper or practice paper in a variety of styles
  • http://chineseworksheetgenerator.org/ – I love, love, love this Chinese Worksheet Generator. You input any characters that you want and it will generate great looking practice worksheets, along with options for stroke order, etc.. This is especially useful for us because it’s curriculum agnostic and allows us to customize the worksheets for our kids to suit whatever we are learning or need to practice more.
ChineseWorksheetGeneratorBorder
Sample worksheet generated by chineseworksheetgenerator.org

 

Favorite Free Eye Chart Printables

If you’ve read my posts on myopia, you know that eye health is a biggie for me. To help with some of the myopia reversal techniques and also regularly check everyone’s vision, I use free eye chart printables. Since my kids’ tend to memorize the chart, I’ve even made my own customizable 10 feet and 20 feet eye charts.

eyechart
Read the message that I wrote for my kids with https://www.homemade-gifts-made-easy.com/eye-chart-maker.html

Other Favorite Free Teaching Printables

I found this site to have a lot of free teaching printables to help supplement home learning. It’s regularly updated by different sources, so it provides a bit of inspiration even if you don’t find exactly what you’re looking for. It’s UK-based, but many materials are still applicable for us. I’m sure there’s a US equivalent, but I just haven’t come across it yet.

Thoughts? More info? Better info? I’m all ears. Email me at:  wishiknewbefore20@gmail.com or leave a comment below.

Reduce Your Allergies Naturally

phytocort asthma allergies
From left, Vitamin C, a bottle of liquid extract of Chinese medicine, Phytocort

Maybe Zyrtec doesn’t work for you lately or perhaps you don’t like its side effects. Personally, I fear that we don’t know much about the long-term use of these “safe” OTC antihistamines for allergy relief. Instead, I’m hoping to treat my sneezing family as naturally as possible. Below are some of the things that I’ve been reading about (and in some cases, trying out):

1. Avoid Antibiotics as Much as Possible

Scientists are increasingly looking at an imbalance in the microbiome as the root cause of many of the problems we have with our immune systems not working properly. These problems include both food and environmental allergies, asthma, and dermatitis.

It’s not too far of a stretch to see the problem with taking antibiotics, since antibiotics essentially kill all the bacteria you have, both the good and the bad.

I really wish I knew this before, both for myself and the rest of my family. Apparently, some of the good bacteria don’t come back. Antibiotic overuse has also been linked to people suddenly developing serious allergies later in life. It should also be noted that antibiotics can be found in our food and water supplies, so even if you’ve managed to avoid antibiotics for infections, you’ll probably still have some low level of exposure to it. (This topic deserves it’s own blog post.) But basically, avoid antibiotics as much as you’re able!

2. Try Traditional Chinese Medicine to Address the Root Cause

Perhaps strengthening your body in other ways can still help to address your immune system gone awry. I don’t want to be lugging an air purifier around for the rest of my life! Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) practitioners often claim that acupuncture and herbal medicine can alleviate symptoms as well as address the root cause of hay fever.

Since TCM is tailored to the individual’s constitution, I didn’t find any obvious herbal formulas to try for adults. Generally speaking, I found these herbs commonly listed in formulas to address the root cause of allergies: ginseng, huang qi (astragalus root), bai zhu, gancao. I’ve also read about PhytoCort which some people find to treat asthma and reduce allergies.

For children, I’ve been looking for ways to address what seems to be cough-variant asthma in one of my kids. A TCM practitioner recommended a combination of liquid extract formulas from “Gentle Warriors”, a line of children’s herbal formulas. The formulas were selected based on my child’s constitution and the presenting symptoms. I’m skeptical, but also hopeful. We’re trying it out for 1-2 months and I’ll be sure to update this post with our results.

Update as of 1/6/2021: After we tried these formulas last year, my child’s cough-variant asthma seems to have disappeared! After having this asthma cough for over 1 year, it’s now been gone for 5 months! We’ve managed to keep off of Qvar and Singulair, oral steroids that had bad side effects for us.

3. Eat a Diet Rich in Natural Antihistamines

If you’re in the midst of having allergic symptoms, this approach isn’t going to help you right away. However, over a couple weeks, it sounds like a person with mild allergies could benefit. Common foods with natural antihistamines include: bell peppers, citrus fruits, pineapples, broccoli, cauliflower, berries, apples, tomatoes, black/green tea, ginger.

My family has pretty good eating habits and many foods on this list are already a regular part of the diet. Yet we still have allergic symptoms so I’ll have to say this doesn’t get rid of all your allergies, although I guess they could always be worse.  Anecdotally, as a data point, I’ve noticed that my two kids who rate equally on the allergy scale, have different levels of allergic symptoms. The one who happens to eat a lot more fruits (2-3x more than the normal serving that everyone else eats), also happens to experience less allergic symptoms. Then I read this study about how a Mediterranean diet rich in fruit and vegetables was found to be associated with less allergy symptoms, which further boosted my small finding.

4. Take Natural Supplements to Boost the Immune System

The amount of natural antihistamines found in foods may not be enough for some allergies. Higher dosages in capsule or powder form enable higher intake to replicate the dosages given in scientific studies. These supplements include:

Vitamin C – I found Vitamin C at the top of many lists. Apparently, vitamin C both inhibits the release of histamine from anti-inflammatory cells as well as helps to break down histamine after it has been released. However, the current recommended daily allowances (RDAs) for children (25mg-45mg) and adults (65mg-90mg) may be too low to create the expected allergic relief. The current RDAs were in fact calculated as the amount needed to prevent scurvy and not other ailments. According to the ODS, the highest daily intake likely to pose no risks is:

  • 400 mg for infants aged 1–3 years
  • 650 mg for children aged 4–8 years
  • 1,200 mg for children aged 9–13 years
  • 1,800 mg for teenagers aged 14–18 years
  • 1,800 mg in pregnant or breastfeeding teenagers aged 14–18 years
  • 2000 mg for adults

For my kids, I decided to trial 400-500mg dose. We are only 1 week into it, so I will have to update this post when I have more observations.

Quercetin – this is an antioxidant also regularly included in everyone’s list. It’s high in leafy greens, apples, grapes, and onions to name a few. I saw a range of dosage recommendations for taking it as a supplement. For adults, I saw a range from 500mg daily to 1000mg 2x/day. For children, Dr. Weil says 200mg daily 2x/day for hay fever.

N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) – this is an antioxidant that some websites report is stronger than Vitamin C. It’s touted as being able to break down mucous, and reduce allergy symptoms. While it can be found naturally in protein-rich foods that you might eat, like turkey, eggs, etc., a much higher dose is needed for therapeutic effect. I read that NAC caused stomach pain in high doses for some users, so I would proceed with caution. I saw recommended dosages of 300mg 2-3x daily.

Probiotics – Probiotics are the supplements that contain the good bacteria that your gut needs for a healthy immune response. Whether probiotics are effective in putting the good bacteria in your gut is still being studied. However, this doesn’t stop a lot of people from trying. There have been quite a few studies that suggest taking probiotics may result in less hay fever symptoms.

What has worked for you? If there is something that has really worked for you, I would love to know about it!

Email me at:  wishiknewbefore20@gmail.com or leave a comment below.

 

Resources

Natural allergy relief in general

On Traditional Chinese Medicine for children

https://www.craneherb.com/shared/articles/28_Gentle_Warriors.aspx

On Vitamin C

On quercetin

On NAC

On probiotics

On antibiotic use and allergies

Thoughts? More info? Better info? I’m all ears. Email me at:  wishiknewbefore20@gmail.com or leave a comment below.

7 Ways to Reduce Physical Exposure to Environmental Allergens

I try to avoid the use of allergy medications as much as possible, so I’ve tested out a variety of non-medical ways to reduce my family’s environmental allergic reactions to tree pollens, grass pollens, and dust mites. Here are the things that we do that seem to have helped in order of suspected effectiveness.

1) Run the air purifier

We have serious dust mite allergies, so I run an air purifier on high in my children’s carpeted bedroom about 1 hour before their bedtime, then I switch it to low for the remainder of the night. We’ve been told to run it 24/7, but that seems excessive. Apparently, it takes approximately 1 hour for the air in the bedroom to be completely filtered. I also run it about 1 hour after I vacuum. Our vacuum doesn’t have a HEPA filter, and I’ve also read that even if it does have a HEPA filter, the sheer act of vacuuming kicks up enough dust (mites) that then need to be filtered. There seem to be a lot of fancy, pretty models on the market these days. We have a pretty old Honeywell one that looks like this model. It seems to do the job, so my thought is, you may not necessarily need a fancy medical grade one.

2) Avoid being outside between 5am to 10am

I only recently learned about this, but according to multiple online sources, pollen counts are highest between 5am-10am and after sunset. Close your windows before dark! I realized how true it was when one of my kids started having a runny nose every time we tried to do a 7am walk during shelter-in-place, but had zero issues when out in the afternoon. So much for trying to become an early morning exercise person.  On the other hand, now I feel a lot better about sleeping in.

3) Wear a face mask

ReduceEnvironmentalAllergens
I’ve got a lot of face masks around the house these days.

If you do have to be outside in the early morning, then try a face mask. This made a HUGE difference for my massive grass allergy when I was outdoors recently – it wasn’t even a PM 2.5 or N95 mask. Just a simple, single layer fabric mask seemed to do the trick. Fortunately, it’s become normal to wear masks these days, so my grass allergy symptoms have significantly improved.  I also suspect I have a temperature sensitivity allergy that is sensitive to the change from the warmth of my bed and being suddenly cooler. I swear it’s real, and putting on a mask immediately after getting out of bed seemed to help!

4) Vacuum regularly

By this, I mean once every 1-2 weeks. That may seem like a lot or very little to you. To me, it feels like a lot and so we have an iRobot that we set loose in the bedroom. It really helps, especially with getting under the bed and not making it seem like such a chore. Again, we have a very old model (older than this, so it’s not a true HEPA filter and doesn’t filter dust mites), but I still see a very full dust container at the end of each run. I run it twice for good measure. We run the air purifier to get rid of the resulting airborne dust mites (in theory).

5) Use a nasal spray / Neti Pot / eye wash

I keep a few canisters of regular saline spray by our home’s entrances. If it seems like a high allergen day, I have the kids do a thorough spray in each nostril and blow, when they’ve been outside. We’ve tried this Arm & Hammer brand and the Little Remedies brand with similar results. Arm & Hammer is available at our local Costco for a much better price. Ideally, I could teach them to use the Neti Pot, but it’s a little too involved.

My mom and kids seem to also have a strong reaction to allergens in the eyes and frequently have very red or itchy eyes after being outside. We have used allergy eye drops, but I don’t find them very effective. Instead, briefly washing the eyes out with a few artificial eye drops or eye wash seems to help clear or prevent the red. The sooner you do it after being outside, the better it works. We use these single use Refresh vials the most.

6) Use dust mite covers

These alone, didn’t seem enough to make an actual difference. My kids were still getting congested at night when we had these. I think the air purifier made the most difference. But now we have the dust mite covers for all their pillows, mattresses, and duvets, and I’m not about to remove them to test. All covers are not equal though, so I researched a bit and ended up using this website’s reviews to help with the selection and considerations.

7) Run pillows and comforters through the dryer on high heat

High heat is supposed to kill or at least reduce dust mites, so I run the kids’ pillows and comforters on high heat in the dryer for 20-30 minutes every month. Since I only do this about once a month, it’s hard for me to tell if this is a necessary step or if changing sheets along with the use of dust mite covers is enough.

Thoughts? More info? Better info? I’m all ears. Email me at:  wishiknewbefore20@gmail.com or leave a comment below.